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Thursday, August 28, 2014

September

For most in our dance world, from September on, it is mostly cruising in the same style as during the prior months of the year except there is extra Party Time. I never see any thing on Labor Day, shouldn't we be have some fun on that day?

"And it takes a level of respect to appreciate for what some people are - 
and perhaps, for who they aren't."

Some people will communicate with us and we may include it in our print. Some have other ways to advertise and they should exercise their privileges. But we can give you a better idea of what blogs are good for.


Wahiawa Ballroom Dance Club is having a Filipino Fiesta at the Wahiawa Recreation Center on Friday September 9th. And some of the attendees are going to be swinging from the chandeliers. No truth to the rumor of six cases of champagne.


Kapolei Chapter HBDA will have their session end Social at the Makakilo Community Park on Monday, September 8th and they will have as special guests the members of the newly formed Ewa Beach Chapter, HBDA. Promises to be a rousing good time for all.

"Dance of Destiny" by Tony Martin

And according to Richie's blogging:
Divino Ritmo is having a their monthly social dance session at their studio, the Aloha Dancesport Center on September 13th and  29th. There is dancing around town.


For some reason or another National Ballroom Dance Week has never been extensively promoted here in Hawaii. This year it will September 19 to 28 and I haven't read anything at all here. There seems to be quite a bit on the Mainland. It is USADance sponsored and other dance groups would rather not intrude.

"Somewhere Over The Rainbow" by Bruddah Iz

It would be nice to make it a week to remember in our community. It is never too soon to think about how Hawaii's Chapter will participate in this special week long celebration of ballroom dance. We have few reasons.  The first is to share with others what we enjoy so much, social ballroom dancing. Unless they have new restrictions lately.


Sunday, August 24, 2014

Blog Sites

What is this Blog Site?

In our case it is a series of content (called "posts") that are usually organized by date with the most recent post showing first. Our blog may have several bloggers, each having their own blog within the blog and blogging whatever and whenever they damn well please. It is their blog. Our blogs also have "comment" forms at the end of every post that allow the readers to give the authors feedback and interact with other readers.

"Once you have accepted your flaws, no one can use them against you."


Blogs (taken from the phrase "web logs") were originally created for personal journaling. Now people use them in place of a website and some people, even own both. Our blogs have a topic (dancing) that compels us to write fresh information about dancing on a consistent basis. Fortunately, we are not territorially bound, and if we can get enough help, we can provide fresh and independent content on a regular basis. Otherwise, people may stop reading our blog if all they see is SOS. (same old shit.)


In order to create a blog you need to choose a platform. The two most common blog platforms are WordPress and Blogger. Both platforms are free and provide user-friendly editors for you to publish your content. No programming or additional software is needed. If you do decide to go with a blog, the proper study of the possible readership is very important.

"Volare" by Dominic Mondugno

Then the ultimate for this blog is to become independent.  With a couple more Guest Authors, the hits will run up enough so that the blog will not need me. We can choose another Administrator and I can phase myself out to my ultimate resignation. I have too many other blogs to work on.  I am sure that the Guest Authors will run the hits up where no one can catch them. Of course, I could work on getting the second best independent.

Wednesday, August 20, 2014

USA Dance Disaster Fundraiser

A message from USA Dance Honolulu Chapter President, Glenn Okazaki:



Aloha,

USA Dance, ‘Beneath the August Moon monthly dance is this Friday, August 22.  We invite all our members as promised, FREEEEEE!!!!  Non-members are also welcomed at this dance for a nominal $6.00 per person, so let your non-member friends know of this upcoming event.

Come on down and join us FRIDAY NITE!!!!

USA Dance will be asking for donations at the door to help our fellow ‘Islanders’ on the Big Island who were hit by Hurricane Issele a week ago.   All of the donations collected will be sent to the ‘HAWAII ISLAND UNITED WAY’  If you would like a receipt for your donation, we will gladly accommodate you.  USA Dance is a Non-profit 501c3 organization and your donations are TAX DEDUCTIBLE!!!!  Please KOKUA !!

The norm for USA Dance Honolulu is our GREAT MUSIC, GREAT SNACKS, and EVERYONE KNOWS EACH OTHER!!!!  YEEEAAAAAHHHH

WE ARE EXPECTING YOU FRIDAY!!!

Glenn Okazaki
USA Dance Honolulu

We all know about the recent devastation experienced by the Puna area of the Big Island of Hawaii.  They have been without electricity (which means no refrigeration).  You've seen ice being delivered to the affected residents so they can keep some of their provisions from spoiling.  Agriculture was heavily hit.  Acres of papaya trees were flattened.  Macadamia and coffee were also affected.  It is estimated that it may take up to three years for the agribusiness in that area to recover to pre-hurricane levels.  The American Red Cross has been holding a telethon to raise funds to help disaster victims.

At the last Board Meeting, USA Dance, Honolulu Chapter, thought this would be a perfect opportunity to give back to the community of Hawaii and help in the disaster aid.  As Glenn mentioned, USA Dance is a Non-profit 501c3 organization and your donations will be tax deductible.  Setting aside tax deductions, it's always a good thing to help those in need.

Hope you'll be able to come out to our dance Friday night with a charitable heart, and have a good time as well.

With Aloha, 
Calvin & Debra

Tuesday, August 19, 2014

HOT HOT HOT Divino Ritmo's Summer Dance Line-Up

HOT SUMMER Dances Brought to you by Lucas & Yanna!

Friday, August 15, 2014

70th Anniversary

"There was a time when the world asked ordinary men to do extraordinary things."

Seventy Years Ago, From the book, "Paratrooper's Odyssey"

It was a sight that had rarely been seen before and which may never be seen again, the last large-scale night parachute jump of World War II. An hour after midnight on the 15th of August 1944, scattered over 150 miles at ten airfields in West Central Italy, 396 C-47 airplanes began turning over their engines.

At ten-second intervals planes taxied down dirt runways, lifted off and circled into formation. The dust compounded by darkness was so thick that many pilots had to use compass bearings to find their way down the runways.

Take off times were from 0136 to 0151 for the first ten serials, depending on the first check point at the Isle of Elba. Each serial required over an hour to get into formation, a column of "V of Vs" nine planes wide.

The entire formation, from the head of the first serial to the tail of the last, was over one hundred miles long. This was the Albatross Mission, to drop five thousand thirty paratroopers in Southern France.

These men were scheduled to be on the ground several hours before the invasion started. By 0330, the first men were "hitting the silk," out into a darkness that was almost pitch black.

The Beginning


From an old poem by Rudyard Kipling:
Another Time, Another Place.

Theirs not to reason why, theirs but to do or die.
Into the Jaws of Death, into Mouth of Hell
Rode the six hundred.

"The Charge of the Light Brigade"

THE RULE OF LGOPs: Little Groups of Paratroopers
written by an Army man who did not like Paratroopers.

After the end of the best Airborne plan, a most terrifying effect occurs behind the lines on the battlefield. This effect is known as the rule of the LGOPs. This is, in its purest form, small groups of pissed-off 19-year-old American Paratroopers. They are well-trained, armed-to-the-teeth and lack serious adult supervision. They collectively remember the Commander's intent as "March to the sound of the guns and kill anyone who is not dressed like you..."...or something like that. Happily they go about the day's work.

Saturday, August 9, 2014

Dancing on Oahu

Male dancers have a reputation of being effeminate, why?

Simply put it’s because quite often we are. In  learning to dance you get less clumsy and move more with the rhythm. This does not mean we are gay though! Dance training, whether on the street or in the studio makes you very aware of your body, men stop slouching, they walk more gracefully and try not to walk like a horse stuck in a muddy swamp and they hold themselves up very nicely.

"Life may not be the party we hoped for, but while we are here, Let's Dance."


They become elegant, less squat and clumsy. Let’s dispel a myth once and for all. Male dancers are not gay. There are some, of course it is the natural part of the order, but they want to dance. In a typical club there are typically 3 to 4 girls for every guy. Work it out, male dancers have great fun dancing!


In the Mainland there are special clubs with single gender dancing. Men with men and women with women. They seem to be gaining in popularity. That is their business and they should be allowed to do it if they are not harming anyone.

"Morning Dew" by Melveen Leed.

With such female to male ratios on Oahu and the very social nature of dance clubs we have now on Oahu, many male dancers consider it one of dancing’s greatest benefits! Do we need more men? You'd bettah believe it! We should not have much trouble here.

Sorry folks but we are going to have to this blog on hold, there are now two Russian Robots in the hits and stopping all the rest that could be in there. At least a week.

Tuesday, August 5, 2014

The Change

This blog has not been this low in hits for a year. Screwed up by a Robot in Russia, but we gotta take it as it comes. My cutting back on the blogging and the reorganization in the West seems to be going right. It may turn out that it was just what was needed. There is a much bigger percentage of social dancers in the West sector. In town we have a bigger portion in the exhibition and competition areas. Let's just get along as best we can.

"Don't worry about haters. They may be angry because the truth you speak
may contradict the lies they live."


Can dancing ever be ‘rough’? Do dancers ever get injured?

Well, many have sprained their achilles tendons and developed Repetitive Stress Injuries (RSI) in both feet. Many have pulled muscles in their back, fingers and calves. Some have had their partners split their lip with an elbow in Jive and many have regularly been assaulted by stiletto heels. Yes, dancing can get hairy! Most of the injuries dancers get result from either pulled muscles and from injuries resulting from dancing in high heels, twisted ankles and impaled toes. The faster the dance the more likely the injury.

"The Maui Waltz" by Loyal Garner


A portion of the instructions from on high:
"For movement variability, all three body regions were normally distributed, although seven of their 38 constituent parts were not. We found significant positive correlations between dance ratings and central body region variability with all components being important, these were: neck flexion
extension; neck abduction adduction (head sideways tilting); neck internal external rotation (head shaking); trunk flexion extension; trunk adduction abduction; and trunk internal external rotation (twisting)." Anyone know what they are talking about?

"Sh-Boom, Life Could Be A Dream." by the Crew Cuts.

And I really don't believe we need five more dance clubs on this Island. Traffic in town is going to get worse and no one can do anything to stop it. We could use one more dance club in Honokai Hale or even Nanakuli, that would be perfect. The North Shore looks good. We will see what happens with new blog set up in the West. We are getting more interested dance teachers from the Mainland and that is strictly money so they should do as they please.